November 13, 2013
Kafka, the doll, the little girl and transformations

I don’t know the veracity of this tale (which I found on http://running-barefoot-thru-the-forest.tumblr.com) about Franz Kafka, but even if it is fiction, I like it.

Kafka encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me…”

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

July 29, 2013
"I can’t think of any greater happiness than to be with you all the time, without interruption, endlessly, even though I feel that here in this world there’s no undisturbed place for our love, neither in the village nor anywhere else; and I dream of a grave, deep and narrow, where we could clasp each other in our arms as with clamps, and I would hide my face in you and you would hide your face in me, and nobody would ever see us any more."

Starts out nice and then gets creepy. Good old Franz Kafka (The Castle)

(Source: iamcharliesangel)

July 3, 2013
Kafka’s Birthday

I’m not sure that Franz Kafka had many “happy” birthdays, but today is his birth day. He was born in Prague in 1883 (which was then part of the Hapsburg Empire of Bohemia).

Kafka once wrote in a letter to a friend: “The books we need are of the kind that act upon us like a misfortune, that make us suffer like the death of someone we love more than ourselves, that make us feel as though we were on the verge of suicide, or lost in a forest remote from all human habitation — a book should serve as the ax for the frozen sea within us.”

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Filed under: franz kafka birthday 
June 6, 2013
"I cannot make you understand.
I cannot make anyone understand what is happening inside me.
I cannot even explain it to myself."

— Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis

(Source: seabois, via kdecember)

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Filed under: franz kafka quote 
May 18, 2013
Daily Rituals
Ritual  noun– religious or solemn ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according…View Post

Daily Rituals

Ritual  noun– religious or solemn ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according…

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May 8, 2013
“This interesting metal statue by sculptor Jaroslav Rona is based on a vivid description that appears in Franz Kafka’s early short story “Description of a Struggle.” Kafka wrote of a young man riding on another man’s shoulders through the streets of Prague. In Rona’s work, that figure is Kafka himself sitting astride a headless man. “
Jaroslav Róna, Franz Kafka -Prague    via kafkaesque-world

“This interesting metal statue by sculptor Jaroslav Rona is based on a vivid description that appears in Franz Kafka’s early short story “Description of a Struggle.” Kafka wrote of a young man riding on another man’s shoulders through the streets of Prague. In Rona’s work, that figure is Kafka himself sitting astride a headless man. “

Jaroslav Róna, Franz Kafka -Prague    via kafkaesque-world

(Source: keharitomeni, via kdecember)

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Filed under: statue franz kafka 
January 29, 2013
“I usually solve problems by letting them devour me.”
— Kafka, in a letter to Max Brod

“I usually solve problems by letting them devour me.”

Kafka, in a letter to Max Brod

(via nevver)

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Filed under: franz kafka quote 
July 3, 2012
Franz Kafka was born on this day (7/3) in Prague in 1883.
Most people think of him as unhappy, afraid of his father, paranoid, and plaqued by psychosomatic illnesses,guilt and anxiety. 
Unfortunately, that does seem to be much of his life. He described himself as “peevish, miserable, silent, discontented, and sickly.” And the stories and novels we know him for are surreal, dark, and pessimistic. “The Metamorphosis”, “In the Penal Colony”, and The Trial reinforce that gloomy image.
That’s why I was pleased some years ago to read that he actually had some normalcy and happiness in his life.
He was a productive and well-liked employee at an insurance company. He enjoyed to row, ride, and swim.
And you can see it as sad of happy that he found love and happiness in the last year of his life, with a woman named Dora Diamant. Yes, sadly he was suffering from tuberculosis.
Diamant later recalled that “Everything was done with laughter,” and “Kafka was always cheerful. He liked to play; he was a born playmate, always ready for some fun.”
Fun + Kafka. I like that better than the usual portrait of him.

Franz Kafka was born on this day (7/3) in Prague in 1883.

Most people think of him as unhappy, afraid of his father, paranoid, and plaqued by psychosomatic illnesses,guilt and anxiety. 

Unfortunately, that does seem to be much of his life. He described himself as “peevish, miserable, silent, discontented, and sickly.” And the stories and novels we know him for are surreal, dark, and pessimistic. “The Metamorphosis”, “In the Penal Colony”, and The Trial reinforce that gloomy image.

That’s why I was pleased some years ago to read that he actually had some normalcy and happiness in his life.

He was a productive and well-liked employee at an insurance company. He enjoyed to row, ride, and swim.

And you can see it as sad of happy that he found love and happiness in the last year of his life, with a woman named Dora Diamant. Yes, sadly he was suffering from tuberculosis.

Diamant later recalled that “Everything was done with laughter,” and “Kafka was always cheerful. He liked to play; he was a born playmate, always ready for some fun.”

Fun + Kafka. I like that better than the usual portrait of him.

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