July 16, 2014
"I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around — nobody big, I mean — except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff — I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all."

This quote is from the end of The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger when Holden explains is wish to be the catcher who saves kids, like his sister, from going over that crazy cliff into the phony world of adulthood.

July 16, 2014
The Catcher in the Rye's path to publication - a PBS American Masters’ infographic from their J. D. Salinger episode.

The Catcher in the Rye's path to publication - a PBS American Masters’ infographic from their J. D. Salinger episode.

July 16, 2014
"If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth."

the opening of The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

July 16, 2014
The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger was published on this date in 1951.
16-year-old prep school runaway, Holden Caulfield, flees the “phonies” with a plan to live in a cabin in California. He makes it to NYC.

The novel was once the most banned book and the most frequently taught book in the country.Despite J.D. Salinger's famous dislike of publicity, Catcher was a best-seller almost immediately, reaching No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list after two weeks. It has sold more than 65 million copies.

The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger was published on this date in 1951.

16-year-old prep school runaway, Holden Caulfield, flees the “phonies” with a plan to live in a cabin in California. He makes it to NYC.

image

The novel was once the most banned book and the most frequently taught book in the country.

Despite J.D. Salinger's famous dislike of publicity, Catcher was a best-seller almost immediately, reaching No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list after two weeks. It has sold more than 65 million copies.

November 29, 2013
J.D. Salinger - Three Stories

Three unpublished stories by J.D. Salinger that have never appeared in print or online mysteriously surfaced first on a bittorrent site before being posted to Reddit.

The Reddit poster claimed the stories were purchased in an ebay auction for about $109.88.

The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls,” “Paula,” and “Birthday Boy" are the 3 titles. "The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls" has been available to read under supervision at Princeton and is considered one of Salinger’s best unpublished work. "Paula" and "Birthday Boy" are both housed at the University of Texas and have been available for researchers there.

"The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls" is described as a somewhat prequel to the his Catcher in the Rye.  It was originally written for Harper’s Bazaar, but Salinger pulled it before publication. The story features an appearance by Cathcer’s protagonist, Holden Caufield.

"While I do quibble with the ethics (or lack of ethics) in posting the Salinger stories, they look to be true transcripts of the originals and match my own copies." Kenneth Slawenski, author of “J.D. Salinger: A Life”

October 17, 2013
"One day, a long time from now you’ll cease to care anymore whom you please or what anybody has to say about you. That’s when you’ll finally produce the work you’re capable of."

J.D. Salinger, written in a letter to Joyce Maynard

I guess I still have a ways to go.

(Source: quotationadmiration)

September 25, 2013
"I mean not try to analyze everything to death for once, if possible. Especially me."

— J.D. Salinger, in Franny and Zooey

September 6, 2013
Harvey Weinstein acquired this documentary for theatrical distribution but does not have the television rights, which were sold to PBS’ American Masters. The release date of September 6, 2013 was chosen for the film to be a candidate for the 86th Academy Awards.
The film will premiere on American Masters as the program’s 200th episode in January 2014.

Harvey Weinstein acquired this documentary for theatrical distribution but does not have the television rights, which were sold to PBS’ American Masters. The release date of September 6, 2013 was chosen for the film to be a candidate for the 86th Academy Awards.

The film will premiere on American Masters as the program’s 200th episode in January 2014.

9:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zv4pbyuIvPst
  
Filed under: j.d. salinger movies 
September 3, 2013
"Nothing in the voice
of the cicada intimates
how soon it will die"

rather haiku-like line by J.D. Salinger, from “Teddy”

(Source: andlohespoke, via kdecember)

March 24, 2013
O snail Climb Mount Fuji, But slowly, slowly!

This haiku by Kobayashi Issa (The Essential Haiku ) was one I first encountered reading J. D. Salinger’s  Franny and Zooey

O snail
Climb Mount Fuji,
But slowly, slowly!

This haiku by Kobayashi Issa (The Essential Haiku ) was one I first encountered reading J. D. Salinger’s  Franny and Zooey

(Source: miyamoto1966)

January 1, 2013
"There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. It’s peaceful. Still. Publishing is a terrible invasion of my privacy. I like to write. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure."

J.D. Salinger - whose birthday is today.  Born Jerome David Salinger in New York City, January 1, 1919.

This famously reclusive author of The Catcher in the Rye died in 2010, at the age of 91, after 50 years spent avoiding the public eye as much as possible.

July 16, 2012
"I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around — nobody big, I mean — except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff — I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all."

— J.D. Salinger   The Catcher in the Rye

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Filed under: j.d. salinger 
July 16, 2012
"If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth."

— J.D. Salinger (opening of The Catcher in the Rye)

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Filed under: j.d. salinger 
July 16, 2012

The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger was published on this date in 1951.
It follows 16-year-old prep school boy, Holden Caulfield, who is fed up with all the “phonies” in his world.
The book took Salinger 10 years to w world. For many years, it was the most banned book and the most frequently taught book in the country.

The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger was published on this date in 1951.

It follows 16-year-old prep school boy, Holden Caulfield, who is fed up with all the “phonies” in his world.

The book took Salinger 10 years to w world. For many years, it was the most banned book and the most frequently taught book in the country.

11:53am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zv4pbyPTK6lm
Filed under: j.d. salinger 
January 1, 2012
That Crazy Cliff

It’s the birthday of J. D. (Jerome David) Salinger, born in New York City (1919). He published his first story, “The Young Folks,” in 1940, in a literary magazine called Story. It was all the encouragement he needed to keep writing. After a series of rejections, his stories were accepted by magazines like Saturday Evening Post and Esquire. He wrote one called “Slight Rebellion Off Madison,” and The New Yorker accepted it, but after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December, the magazine decided Salinger’s story was too light-hearted for a readership stunned by war. Salinger was drafted, and took part in the invasion of Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge, and the liberation of Dachau, but the war was hard on him and he ended up in a military hospital in 1945, suffering from shell shock.

When he returned to the United States in 1946, The New Yorker finally published “Slight Rebellion Off Madison,” and Salinger incorporated some of the story’s elements — including the alienated teenage protagonist, Holden Caulfield — into his first and only novel. The Catcher in the Rye (1951). The New Yorker rejected everything he sent them from 1944 to 1946, including 15 poems, but they were so impressed with his short story “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” (1948) that they drew up a contract giving them the right of first refusal to all of his stories from then on. “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” was the first of several stories featuring the Glass family.

The Catcher in the Rye was an instant success: within two months of publication, it was reprinted eight times. But it also quickly became notorious; parents objected to the casual mentions of prostitutes and Caulfield’s proclivity for swearing. It’s the second-most taught book in American high schools, but it’s also the most censored book in the country. All the publicity and controversy drove Salinger further and further from the public eye, and he moved from New York to Cornish, New Hampshire in 1953. Though he continued to write for his own pleasure — and told a neighbor he had 15 completed novels in his house — he published his last story in The New Yorker in 1965.

The Catcher in the Rye opens:
“If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.”

(Source: writersalmanac.publicradio.org)

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Filed under: writer J.D. Salinger 
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